Wayward Vol. 1: String Theory TP; Story by Jim Zub; Art by Steve Cummings, John Rauch, and Tamra Convillain. • Courtesy Image
Wayward Vol. 1: String Theory TP; Story by Jim Zub; Art by Steve Cummings, John Rauch, and Tamra Convillain. • Courtesy Image

In String Theory, the first volume of the supernatural coming-of-age story Wayward, follows Rori Lane, a hapa child of divorce, as she adjusts from her father’s Irish homeland to her mother’s native Tokyo. But it’s not just her red hair and green eyes that make her stand out—it’s also the latent ability to see paths through space that no one else can. Despite Rori’s outsider status, she ultimately befriends a few other misfits who, like the protagonist, are much more than what they appear to be at first glance. Meanwhile, unbeknownst to the unofficial gang, a powerful threat gathers and threatens to strike.

The illustrations in this comic present a gritty Tokyo that is alternately caustic and beautiful in its realism, capturing the claustrophobia and hidden underbelly of the cosmopolitan gem. The characters are interesting yet mysterious, but through Rori the writers successfully encapsulate the isolation of being a foreigner—someone who stands out within the sea of black hair and brown eyes. Overall gripping and dynamic, String Theory establishes a world that readers are sure to want to continue exploring in future volumes. 

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