Council Member Bruce Harrell meets with the Seattle Human Rights Commission yesterday to talk about police accountability, civil rights leadership, and police reform on July 12, 2013. • Courtesy Photo
Council Member Bruce Harrell meets with the Seattle Human Rights Commission to talk about police accountability, civil rights leadership, and police reform on July 12, 2013. • Courtesy Photo

The Seattle Human Rights Commission is currently seeking candidates to apply for service on the commission. Candidates will be selected and appointed by the mayor and the Seattle City Council. The commission advises the mayor and City Council on human rights and social justice issues.

The commission works with the city to protect, respect, and fulfill the inherent human rights for all who live in the city. The commission uses the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments as its compass in highlighting and addressing human rights issues. The commission also works to impact the lives of people in Seattle through its policy work and community outreach, and works with the Office for Civil Rights to end discrimination.

The commission recently passed a resolution declaring that the second Monday of October, the federal holiday known as Columbus Day, should henceforth be recognized in Seattle as “Indigenous Peoples Day,” the Seattle PI reported.

Last month, the commission sent a letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos calling for an investigation into the treatment of subcontracted security officers working for Security Industry Specialists (SIS). The security officers are alleged to have worked without bathroom breaks and were allegedly threatened or terminated when trying to use paid sick leave.

Participation on the Commission requires a minimum time commitment of 10 to 15 hours per month. This includes attendance at monthly meetings held the first Thursday of each month in the evening, participation in committee work, meeting with City departments, communicating with state legislators, and addressing human rights concerns. The commission also hears and adjudicates appeals of discrimination cases from the Seattle Office for Civil Rights.

Commissioners are appointed for two years and all appointments are subject to confirmation by the City Council. The Commission is interested in applicants with diverse backgrounds, including human rights, social services, education, law, public policy, advocacy, and business. Commissioners serve without compensation. To be considered, email a letter of interest, resume, and application to [email protected] by August 25, 2014. The application is available at www.seattle.gov/humanrights/archive.htm or by request made to [email protected]

The city is committed to promoting diversity in its commissions. Women, people with disabilities, youth, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, immigrants and people of color are encouraged to apply. All are welcome.

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