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Tamiko Nimura

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Naomi Hirahara’s meticulously-researched mystery about postwar midcentury Japanese America

There’s a haunting in Naomi Hirahara’s latest novel, Evergreen — a much-anticipated sequel to her novel, Clark and Division. After wartime incarceration in Manzanar and then resettlement in Chicago, Aki Ito, now Nakasone, and...

Clark and Division beautifully weaves mystery, a portrayal of sisterly relationships and life after...

After camp, what was life like for Japanese Americans being released to the Midwest? Between the larger milestones of camp and redress history, there’s a chasm of decades—and often, of Nisei silence. In addition...

Opinion: Preserve the Seattle National Archives and Records Administration to help preserve API history

This is adapted from Tamiko Nimura’s General Declaration of the value of the Seattle National Archives and Records Administration facility which is currently under threat due to the federal government having made plans to...

Kiku Hughes’ graphic novel Displacement addresses the intergenerational trauma of Japanese American incarceration through...

A time-travel graphic novel about intergenerational Japanese American camp history is a surprise. But even for readers versed in this history, Kiku Hughes’s Displacement is a powerful innovation in camp literature and Japanese American...

Young adult novel “We Are Not Free” tells a compelling story of 14 Japanese...

In the young adult novel We Are Not Free, Yonsei writer Traci Chee follows 14 Nisei teenagers, mostly from San Francisco Japantown, through their wartime incarceration. It’s a daring project; the characters hand off...

“A Really Rich Life”: At 90, Kibei-Nisei Tacoma artist Fumiko Kimura takes stock

“I have had a really rich life,” muses Tacoma artist Fumiko Kimura,  “growing up in United States, partly with family in Japan. I wanted to leave it to my kids. It has been a...

Day of Remembrance, Day of Action” in Tacoma draws multigenerational, multiethnic crowd

The barbed wire on the fences near the crowd was razor-sharp. The rain and wind whipped around the “No More Concentration Camp” banners and the taiko drums, trying to dislodge the strings of carefully...

Children’s picture books tell the valuable stories of artists and their work

Ojiichan’s Gift By Cheri Uegaki, illustrated by Genevieve Simms Ojiichan’s Gift illustrates the tender bond between a Japanese grandfather and his multiracial granddaughter overseas. This is Japanese Canadian Chieri Uegaki’s third picture book for children, and...

George Takei’s graphic memoir “They Called Us Enemy” is an ambitious combination of camp...

“Memory is a wily keeper of the past,” actor George Takei writes, “usually dependable but at times, deceptive. Childhood memories are especially slippery.” Takei should know; his graphic memoir They Called Us Enemy (Top Shelf,...

Issei Photographer Yukio Morinaga’s Quiet Hour illuminates early 20th-Century Seattle

In 1927-28, Seattle Issei Yukio Morinaga was a member of the Seattle Camera Club and the second most exhibited photographer in the world, according to the American Annual of Photography. His distinguished career was...