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Chizu Omori

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“Manzanar Mosaic: Essays and Oral Histories on America’s First World War II Japanese American...

The name Art Hansen should be familiar to many Japanese Americans as one of the foremost scholars in the study of the incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. But beyond his great contribution to...

Memoir ‘Beyond the Betrayal’ by Yoshito Kuromiya casts a beam of light through the...

“When the JACL (Japanese American Citizens League) endorsed the mandatory induction of citizens from the camps into racially segregated military units on the pretext of  ‘proving their loyalty’, they in effect preempted every citizen’s...

Paul Yamazaki keeps the spirit, vision and heart of City Lights bookstore in San...

Is there a more iconic, respected and beloved institution in San Francisco than City Lights? This bookstore has existed for 75 years, in the same building in the same spot in a region in...

Virtual exhibit Seen and Unseen brings parts of the LGBTQ+ Japanese American community out...

Seen and Unseen: Queering Japanese American History Before 1945 is a virtual exhibit that explores the relatively hidden history of queer life in Japanese American history. It is curated by writer Stan Yogi, who...

Professor Masumi Izumi tells the story of the passage of Title II, in...

Masumi Izumi, professor of North American Studies in the Department of Global and Regional Studies at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, specializes in the history of Japanese Americans and Japanese Canadians. In The Rise...

New book tells the firsthand story of Japanese American redress and reparations

NCRR: The Grassroots Struggle for Japanese American Redress and Reparations is an unusual and admirable work, bringing together the voices of the leaders of this organization, Nikkei for Civil Rights and Reparations, and many...

“Looking Like the Enemy” shares the story of Japanese Mexicans during World War II

Japanese have been coming to the western hemisphere for a long time, and they settled in North, Central and South America, establishing communities that remain a thriving part of those countries that comprise the...

50 Objects, 50 Stories helps Japanese American families across the country unlock the past

“There was a story in my family,” says Nancy Ukai, about her grandfather taking a box of eucalyptus leaves with him when he and the family were sent into an incarceration camp during WWII....

Life After Manzanar: Rebuilding and healing after WWII Japanese American incarceration

Manzanar was one of the 10 camps where Japanese American U.S. citizens living on the West Coast were incarcerated during WWII. The book is a group effort, with input and contributions from a range...

‘Something from Nothing’ exhibit shows what was lost during Japanese incarceration

Something From Nothing: Art and Handcrafted Objects From America’s Concentration Camps is an exhibit at the Thatcher Gallery on the campus of the University of San Francisco. This show’s director, Glori Simmons, said that this is “the culmination of nearly a decade of collaboration between the University of San Francisco and the National Japanese American Historical Society.” Students from Architecture and Community Design first worked on this with the objective of studying the preservation of historical sites but with a new program, the Museum Studies Program, started in 2013, a project to digitize NJAHS’s extensive collection of camp artifacts, was begun. This exhibit was organized to bring over 100 objects from NJAHS’ extensive collection to campus as a student project