Visual Arts
Painter Hiro Yokose is part of a group show through Dec. 3 at Winston Wachter Gallery. 203 N. Dexter Ave. (206) 652-5855.

William Traver Gallery. The massive ceramic sculptures of Jun Kaneko fill the room through Nov. 27. 110 Union St. (206) 587-6501.

“Paper” is the medium of choice this time for sculptor Kazuo Kadonaga who often takes time to investigate a particular medium until the inherent qualities of that material reveals itself. Through Dec. 9. Solomon Fine Art. 1215 First Ave. (206) 297-1400.

THE SIMPLE CUP at KOBO at Higo. KOBO and Seward Park Clay Studio will feature the cup form by over 50 renowned North American ceramic artists in an exhibition curated by Peter Olsen. Also, the work of 10 Japanese ceramic artists will showcase the cup form as interpreted in contemporary Japan. Artists include: Akio Takamori, Beth Lo, Ryuzo Toda and others. Through Dec. 30. Tea Tasting Event with Jasmine Pearl Tea Company: Saturday, Nov. 19, 1 – 4 p.m. Taste and learn about some of the best teas from around the world. KOBO at Higo. 604 S. Jackson St. [email protected] (206) 381-3000. www.koboseattle.com.

An exhibit of the work of Watanabe Sadao is on display at the UW East Asia Library through Dec. 16. Watanabe Sadao (1913-1996) was part of the folk art movement in Japan (known as the mingei movement), and he was trained by the master textile dye artist Serizawa Keisuke (1895-1984), who was a founding member of Japan’s mingei movement. East Asia Library, 322 Gowen Hall (3rd Floor).

“Chinatown: Blue Series,” an exhibition by Seattle photographer Daimian Lix, is at the Collins Pub through December. 526 2nd Ave. This show is the second in a two part series exploring the cultural details of Seattle’s Chinatown/ID.

24th annual party showing and sale of Sandy Lew-Hailer’s jewelry and sculpture. Friday, Nov. 18 from 4 – 8 p.m. 3814 4th Ave S. Space 14. (206) 903-0222.

Glasswork by Takuya Tokizawa is part of a group show “Still Life And Other Things” through Dec. 3. ArtsWest Gallery. 4711 California Ave. S.W. West Seattle. (206) 938-0339.

Wing Luke Asian Museum. “Sikh Community: Over 100 Years in the Pacific Northwest” is one of the first looks at this community through photos, oral history and historic materials. Through April 16. “30 Years After the Fall of Saigon” looks at how the end of the Vietnam War affected both old and young. Through Dec. 18. The Family Saturdays program for Nov. 19 at 10 a.m. is “Kimchee.” Learn how to make several kinds of this crunchy, refreshing Korean delicacy. RSVP. 407 – 7th Ave. S. (206) 623-5124.

Korean’s “National Living Treasure” artist Kim Man Hee has a show of his shamanistic inspired work through Nov. 30. His style preserves the traditional “folk art” style of Korea. On view at both Ming’s Asian Galleries in Seattle at 519 – 6th Ave. S. and in Old Bellevue at 10217 Main St.

“Frank Okada: The Shape Of Elegance” is a long over-due retrospective of this late N.W. abstractionist whose paintings shimmer and resonate with the pure beauty of color. Through Jan. 8, 2006. Poet Lawson Inada does a reading with live jazz entitled “Poetry and Painting – A Tribute to Frank Okada” on Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m. Museum of Northwest Art in La Conner. (360) 466-4446. Related programs in Seattle at the Seattle Public Library downtown include a repeat performance of poet Lawson Inada’s “Tribute to Frank Okada” on Nov. 20 at 3 p.m. Kazuko Nakane, who wrote the essay in the exhibition catalogue “Frank Okada: The Shape of Elegance” (MoNA/UW Press) will join him to speak about the artist and sign copies of the catalogue. Microsoft Auditorium. The Seattle Central Library is at 1000 Fourth Ave. In addition, an exhibition entitled “Contributions of Japanese American Artists from the Collections of The Seattle Public Library” will be on view through December on Level 10 of the library.

Performing Arts
The continuing mis-adventures of Asian American singles in Seattle is back for more fun and mirth, this time stumbling on the way to the altar. “Sex in Seattle, Episode 12: My Ultra Quirky Asian American Wedding” Through Nov. 19. Richard Hugo house. 1634 – 11th Ave. (206) 325-6500.

Kaze Daiko & Seattle Matsuri Taiko present “SHINJIRU”on Saturday, Nov. 26. 7 p.m. Broadway Performance Hall, 1625 Broadway. Seattle’s own youth taiko groups, Kaze Daiko and Seattle Matsuri Taiko, come together for their first joint concert! This special show of Japanese drumming, titled “SHINJIRU- believe,” will debut pieces each group has collaboratively composed with the guidance of Kelsey Furuta, veteran member of Tsunami Taiko. $5. www.ticketwindowonline.com. (206) 325-6500.

Film & Video
One of the best kept secrets and best deals in town for learning about Japanese film is the Japanese Film Association’s free Japanese film series. Ongoing through Dec. 8. Nov. 17 has “Goke” by Sato Hajime, in which an ordinary plane ride brought down by birds and aliens crashes on a mars-like planet. Nov. 24 brings Yamada Yoji’s follow-up to “Twilight Samurai,” “Hidden Blade,” another thoughtful and realistic portrayal of samurai. Dec. 1 brings Hiroki Ryuichi’s “Vibrator,” a modern day romance of a man and woman who pass through Japan in a truck. Dec. 8 concludes this series with Shinoda Masahiro’s masterpiece, “Double Suicide” that depicts a classic bunraku puppet play using kabuki acting, abstract sets and puppeteers. Every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Gowen 201 on the UW campus.

Written Arts
GO-MAP Diversity Book Talk Series Fall 2005: Peter Kwong, Professor, Hunter College and City University New York,provocative activist scholar and community advocate,will read from, discuss, and sign his new co-authored book, “CHINESE AMERICA: The Untold Story of America’s Oldest New Community.” By Peter Kwong and Duanka Micevic. University of Washington Graduate School,Graduate Opportunities and Minority Achievement Program (GO-MAP). FREE, seating is limited. Co-sponsored by UW Department of History, UW American Ethnic Studies Department, UW Educators Promoting Diversity and UW College of Education. www.grad.washington.edu/gomap or [email protected]

Elliott Bay Book Company presents Peter Kwong on Friday, Nov. 18 at 7:30 p.m. “Chinese America: A History in the Making” (New Press, co-written with Dusanka Miscevic). 101 South Main. (206) 624-6600.

Bruce Fulton, University of British Columbia, speaks with an introduction by Scott Swaner, Department of Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington. “Modern Korean Fiction: An Anthology.” Dec. 5. 7 p.m. University Book Store, 4326 University Way, (206) 634-3400. Presented by Columbia University Press in conjuction with the University Book Store. For further details, visit http://depts.washington.edu/asianll/news/announcements.html

Andrew Lam will discuss and sign copies of “Perfume Dreams: Reflections on the Vietnamese Diaspora.” Thursday, Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way NE, Lake Forest Park, WA 98155. (206) 366-3316.

Awards/Opportunities
The M. Rosetta Hunter Art Gallery at Seattle Central Community College and Seattle LGBT Center Gallery are seeking submissions in all media for the juried group art exhibition, “PRESENCE.” PRESENCE explores the theme of Queer Civil Rights and is open to all artists living and working in the greater Puget Sound area. PRESENCE will run simultaneously at the M. Rosetta Hunter Art Gallery and the Seattle LGBT Center Gallery during January 2006. Deadline for submission is Friday, Dec. 2. www.seattlecentral.edu/artgallery or contact us at (206) 344-4379. M. Rosetta Hunter Art Gallery @ SCCC, 1701 Broadway or at the Seattle LGBT Community Center, 1115 East Pike Street.

Visual Communications is now accepting entries for the 22nd edition of VC FILMFEST, set for May 4 – 11, 2006. (213) 680-4462×68.

SAALT is seeking submissions for a community documentation project entitled “Community Voices: Embracing Diversity within the South Asian Community in America”that express and reflect upon the diversity of our local communities. A complete description of the project is on the SAALT website. The deadline for the first round of submissions is Nov. 30. www.saalt.org.
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