1. Highlights
  2. Visual Arts
  3. Performing Arts
  4. Film/Media
  5. Art News/ Opportunites

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Highlights

  • Seattle’s own resident gamelan orchestra, Gamelan Pacifica (see related articlein this issue) performs “Gamelan Gadhon”, the classic repertory of Central Javawith special guest Ki Midiyanto. Sat., April 9 at 8 p.m. at Cornish School of ArtsPoncho Concert Hall, located at 710 East Roy just off Broadway on Capitol Hill. Theywill also perform with dancer Didik Niwithowok, two classics of Javanese court danceon April 26 at 7:30 p.m. at UW’s Meany Hall. Guest drummer, Heri Peranto, will alsoperform. See www.gamelanpacifica.org for more details.
  • Two major Asian American writers come to Seattle for rare appearances.Novelist Karen Tei Yamashita whose latest book, “I Hotel” (Coffee House Press)was a National Book Award finalist will read at the Wing’s Community Hallon Sat., April 16 at 4 p.m. The book covers the turbulent period of upheavaland social change as documented in the Bay Area Asian American StudentMovement of the 70’s and the struggle for social justice in community issuessuch as low-income housing and union organizing. Yamashita deftly weavestogether the threads of this multi-faceted story into a very real collection ofthought-provoking human tales. Jointly sponsored by the English Department atUW. WLAM, 719 South King. Call (206) 623-5124 or www.wingluke.org. The state ofAsian American poetry would be vastly different without the major pioneering effortsof poet Lawson Fusao Inada who had the first book by an Asian American poetpublished on a major press. He makes two appearances in the northwest. Hejoins Emmett Wheatfall in a jazz performance with poems first on Fri., April 22at First Unitarian Church at 1211 SW Main St, in Portland and again on Sat.April 23 at 7 p.m. at Daniels Recital Hall at 811 Fifth Ave. in Seattle. For moreinformation, go to www.noahpeterson.com.
  • Science writer/physicist Michio Kaku talks about his book “Physics of theFuture” which offers a vision of the future and the predictions of how sciencewill shape human life by the year 2100. At Town Hall on Wed., April 6 at 7:30 p.m.www.townhallseattle.org.
  • Want to broaden your musical horizons and help out with Japan earthquakerelief? Do both by attending the following events – Kirkland Performance Centerand Pony Boy Records present “A Gathering of Japan-Loving Jazz Performersfor Disaster Relief” in a concert entitled Jazz For Japan” on Mon. April 18 at 7:30p.m. Includes many talented local performers. For tickets, call (425) 895-9900 orwww.kpcenter.org. Proceeds from ticket sales and donations go directlyto Peace Winds Japan Disaster Relief. Music from Okinawa seems to resonatewith the spirits and influences from the many countries who occupied that smallisland nation such as China and Japan. There is a mournful, bittersweet tang tothe music that still resonates with a lilting joy. A good introduction to the tradition can be had by attending the “20th Anniversary Charity Concert” by RyukuSokyoku Koyokai of Washington. All ticket sales benefit Japan relief. Sunday,May 1 at 1 p.m. Highline Performing Arts Center at 401 South 152nd St. inBurien.(425) 308-1878.
  • “What remains: Japanese Americans In Internment Camps” is a show thatfeatures quilts by Cathy Erickson and poetry by Margaret Chula. On view throughJune 26. Open Wed. – Sun. 11am – 5pm and by appointment only on Mon. &Tues. La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum in the Historic Gaches Mansion. 703 S.Second St. in La Connor. (360) 466-4288 or visit www.laconnerquilts.com
  • NW Sinfonietta presents “Pictures at an Exhibition “(see related article in thisissue), a unique multi-media collaboration with Seattle’s Asian community. HearDebussy, Gershwin & Mussorgsky with Julian Yu, Joel Tan and Andrea Natono.Friday, April 15 at 7:30pm . Nordstrom Hall at Benaroya downtown. (866) 833-4747. Or nwsinfonietta.org
  • Local UW Ceramics Professor and internationally known ceramic artist AkioTakamori has a show of new work scheduled for the month of April at JamesHarris Gallery. Takamori’s work crackles with a wry wit that satirizes both historyand the human condition. James Harris Gallery, 312 Second Ave. S. Call (206)903-6220 or go to www.jamesharrisgallery.com.
  • SIS Productions presents “Sex in Seattle 19 – The One That Got away”, thelatest set of comedic mis-adventures of Seattle’s Asian American singles aswritten by Kathy Hsieh. April 1 – 30 at Hugo House. For reservations, call(206) 323-9443 or go to [email protected] To buy tickets in advance, gothrough Brown Paper Tickets website.
  • “Struggling Cities: Japanese Urban Projects in the 1960’s” is an exhibition that takesa fresh look at proposals on the city that were put forth by noted Japanese architects.By looking at these proposals now, we can look ahead to the challenges all cities facein global architecture and what works best for its citizenry. The show will remain onview April 11 – 29 during weekdays by appointment at MulvanneyG-2 Architecture inBellevue. MulvanneyG-2 Architecture, 1110 – 12th Ave. NE #500. Call (425) 463-2000.
  • Ceramic artist Wanxin Zhang responds to China’s unearthed army of terracotta soldiers with life-size ceramics of his own. “Warhol/Mao” is just one ofmany contemporary responses by this artist in “Wanxin Zhang: A Ten YearSurvey” at Bellevue Arts Museum located on 510 Bellevue Way N.E. This exhibitruns through August 4. Also noted is the show entitled “Master of Deception– the Furniture of John Cederquist” in which this furniture maker makes free-standing cabinets in the shapes of kimonos. Through May 15, 2011. For moreinformation, call (425) 519-0770 or visit www.bellevuearts.org.
  • “Shadows of a Fleeting World: Pictorial Photography and the Seattle Camera Club” looks at the primarily Japanese American Seattle Camera Club and therole it played in the pictorial style. With over 100 works by Seattle CameraClub members, Dr. Kyo Koike, Frank Kunishige, Iwao Matsushita and ImogeneCunningham will be presented through May 8. The exhibition is curated by HenryChief Curator Elizabeth Brown and presented in partnership with the Universityof Washington Press and Special Collections at the University of WashingtonLibraries. The Henry Art Gallery is located on 15th Ave. NE & NE 4lst Street. Call(206) 543-2280 or go to www.henryart.org for more information.
  • “RED” is a new show by Pakistani artist Humaira Abid that explores the symbolicmeanings of that color such as love, passion, anger and death. Using carvedwood sculptures and miniature paintings, she examines the roles of women insocial/religious culture and the state of a changing homeland. The artist talksabout her work and contemporary art in Pakistan on April 16 from noon until 3p.m. The exhibit will be on view through April at the ArtXchange Gallery at 512First Ave. S. For more information, call (206) 839-0377.
  • Frye Art Museum presents a new exhibit by Degenerate Art Ensemble led byHaruko Nishimura and Joshua Kohl held March 18 through July 5. The showfeatures props, photos, videos from past performances with various live mini-events and artist tours throughout the run of the exhibit with the premiere of anew work entitled “The Red Shoes” (set for performance on May 12 throughJune 2). Nishimura & Kohl talk to Deputy Director Robin Held on April 21at 7 p.m. in the Frye Auditorium. Haruko Nishimura presents a Butoh dance workshopentitled “Embodiment and the Committed Presence Through Imageryon Saturdays from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on April 16, 23 and 30 in the Frye Art Studio.Register online at fryemuseum.org/tickets or call (206) 423-8200. The museumis located at 704 Terry Ave. Call (206) 622-9250 or visit www.fryeart.org for moreinformation.
  • Acclaimed South Korean novelist Kyung-sook Shin reads from “Please LookAfter Mom” (Knopf) on Mon., April 11 at Elliott Bay Book Company. A family’schorus of voices come together in concern after their mother disappears.152110th Ave. Call (206) 624-6600 or www.elliottbaybook.com.
  • N.Y. Times journalist Joseph Lelyveld reads from “Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhiand his Struggle with India” (Knopf) on April 14 at 7 p.m. Considered one of themost revealing, richly detailed portraits of this complex world leader. SeattleAsian Art Museum’s Stimson Auditorium. 1400 E. Prospect. Free with museumadmission. Co-presented with Elliott Bay. Visit www.seattleartmuseum.org.
  • The late Akira Kurosawa’s masterpiece “Seven Samurai” tells the story ofsamurai trying to teach villagers who to protect their land from maraudingbandits. With a dynamic performance by a young Toshiro Mifune. Digitallyprojected in high definition. April 13 at 7:15 p.m. as part of the Metro Classicsseries. Located at 4500 – 9th Ave. NE. Call (206) 781-5755. Advance ticket sales at tickets.landmarktheatres.com www.landmarktheatres.com.

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Visual Arts

  • Each member of the art collective SOIL has invited a guest artist to exhibit workat the gallery resulting in the group show “DUG: Soil Invitational 2011”. Includeswork by Bo Choi and Rumi Koshino. Opening reception is April 7 from 6 – 8 p.m.Artist talk on April 9 at 2 p.m. Located at 112 3rd Ave. S. Go to www.soilart.org.
  • “Blossom: Develop. Mature. Thrive” is a group show featuring contemporaryAsian-inspired works by Northwest artists. Includes work by Barry Wong, AkiSogabe, Chiyo Sanada, Makiko Ichiura, Linda Hoshide, Kay Hirai, ToshikoHasegawa, Malpina Chan and Carina del Rosario. April 1 – 24. NW Craft Centerat Seattle Center. Located 305 Harrison. Call (206) 728-1555 orwww.northwestCraftCenter.com.
  • Maki Tamura has work in the joint exhibition entitled “Cultural Activism in a Timeof Crisis” on view through May 6 at the M. Rosetta Hunter Art Gallery at SeattleCentral Community College. Opening reception on April 6 from 5 – 8 p.m. Free.For details, visit www.seattlecentral.edu/artgallery.
  • “Paradoxes of Living on Holy Land” is a series of photographs of Jerusalem andthe West Bank by Rajiv Kapoor. Through May 1. Columbia City Gallery at 4864Rainier Ave. S. Call (206) 760-9843 or visit www.columbiacitygallery.com.
  • Local artist Suiren (aka Renko Ishida Dempster) is presented by Deep ListeningInstitute in an on-line show “Art on theWall” as part of “Women & Identity” duringApril at www.vimeo.com/21467571.
  • “I Waited a Long Time For You” is the title for Mugi Takei’s series of personaldrawings at times wistful, charming and then ironic done in bright colors. A DVDof the drawings also viewable in the gallery makes her personal visions comealive. On view through April at the Cullom Gallery. Artists and poets (includingTakei) of Seattle’s Pilot Books as part of the 2nd Annual Small Press Festival willbe in conversation with readings on March 24 at 7 p.m. at the Cullom Gallery,located at 603 S. Main Street. Call (206) 340-8000 for more information.
  • Local artist Romson Bustillo shows his media print collages in a group show often local artists entitled “The Chair Project” now on view at Seattle Design Centerlocated at 5701Sixth Ave. S. For details go to www.romson.tumblr.com.
  • The work of Diem Chau is included in a group show entitled “The MysteriousContent of Softness”. The show brings together national and internationalartists in an exploration of the transformative power of fiber and its connectionto the human body. Chau’s work is on view through June 26 at theBellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way NE. Call (425) 519-0770 or go to www.bellevuearts.org for more information.
  • Local photographer Carina del Rosario has work in issue #46 of F-Stop, aphotography magazine online. Visit www.fstopmagazine.com.
  • Together with Nicholas Nyland and Maki Tamura, Saya Moriyasu has created acollaborative installation work entitled “A Clearing in the Clouds”. Works may beviewed at Seattle’s ACT Theatre at 700 University Street. Ongoing.
  • Lele Barnett, who recently curated an interesting show for Wing Luke has put agroup show together entitled “Forecast” in which she features 36 artists and eightscientists. This show is free and runs through April 9 at the Washington StateConvention & Trade Center, 800 Convention Place, on the second floor. Call(206) 694-5000 for more information.
  • The art of Tina Koyama in the group show entitled “Connectivity” is on viewthrough April 10 at Oasis Gallery, located on 3644 Wallingford Ave. N., Seattle.Call (206) 547-5177 or go to www.oasisinseattle.com for more information.
  • An exhibit entitled “History of Pacific Northwest Japanese Restaurants” is onview until June 1, 2011 at the Northwest Nikkei Museum in the Japanese Culturaland Community Center of Washington. Included are excerpts from interviewswith those who owned, worked and grew up with the restaurants in the PacificNorthwest. The Japanese Cultural and Community Center is located at 1414 S.Weller. Call (206) 568-7114 or visit www.jcccw.org for more information.
  • KOBO Gallery at HIGO has a show of new paintings by Japan-born JunkoYamamoto are on view through April 16. Yamamoto’s painting references natureand pop culture to delightful effect. Also an ikebana workshop is offered April17 from 1 – 3 p.m. Pre-registration required. KOBO Gallery at HIGO is located at604 South Jackson St., Seattle. Call (206) 381-3000 or www.koboseattle.com formore information.
  • “Wang Huaiqing: A Painter’s Painter in Contemporary China” traces the artist’sdevelopment through 23 innovative works. Recognized as one of China’sleading contemporary artists for his ability to blur the line between abstractand naturalistic art, his work is on view through July 17. “Artful Reproductions”looks at how Chinese fabricate complex objects in great quantity. On displayare pairs and sets of similar objects that are a result of that productivity. OpensApril 1. Also opening April 30 and on view till Sept. 9 is “Modern Elegance:The Art of Meiji Japan”. “Books on Meiji Art” is an installation that showcasesbook selections from the McCaw Foundation Library’s collection on Japaneseart during the Meiji era. On view from April through June, 2011. Lectures onCentral Asia sponsored by the Gardner Center take place Saturdays throughApril 16 from 9:30 – 11 a.m. Topics are “Struggles of Central Asia SinceIndependence” on April 9 and “Creating Community – Solutions to Rural Issues
  • in Central Asia” on April 16. “Golden Week Lectures” set for April 30 from 10 a.m.– noon include the following. Susan Whitfield talks about “Discovering LostCultures of the Silk Road” and Mimi Yien gpruksawan speaks on “Michinaga’sPeacocks: The Heian World in Global Perspective”. All of these events are atthe Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 Prospect Ave. Call (206) 654-3100 or visitwww.seattleartmuseum.org.
  • “Born Into Identity: The Asian Pacific American Adoptee Experience” includes13 APA Adoptee artists and oral histories from community members explorethe complexities of being an APA adoptee, which is on view through June19. “Sacred Seattle” is an exhibit that traces spaces, places and paths whereAsian Pacific Americans both belong to and long for the sacred. This will be onview through March 20. “Home Revealed: Artists of the Chinatown-InternationalDistrict” remains on view till April 17, 2011. “Cultural Confluence: Urban Peopleof Asian & Native American Heritages” will also be on view. The historic legaciesand contemporary lives of people who are both Asian and Native come togetherfor the first time in this exhibit and is on view through Sept. 18. An exhibitentitled “New Years All Year Round” that looks at Asian traditions for the NewYear from various Asian cultures will be on view through June 26. Family FunDay on April 16 begins at 1 p.m. and features artist Romson Regarde Bustillowho will show you how to create Chinese zodiac animal parts you can wear.Experience the Museum’s historic hotel tour at a discount on the first Thursday,April 7 from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. with free gallery admission. For details on all of theabove, go to www.wingluke.org or call (206) 623-5124.
  • “New Gifts And Acquisitions: Collections Selections Two” is a group show withmuch of the featured art coming via a donation of the Safeco Art Collectionto the Washington Arts Consortium. This show includes work by George andGerard Tsutakawa and will be on view through June 5. Whatcom Museum at theLightcatcher, 121 Prospect St., Bellingham, WA. Call (360) 778-8930 for moreinformation.
  • The work of Seattle jewelry artist Ron Ho and nationally known ceramicartist Toshiko Takaezu is included in a group show of handmade objectsentitled “Process and Presence” on view through July 4 at Maryhill Museum ofArt in Goldendale,WA. (509) 773-3733 or visit www.maryhillmuseum.org.
  • A retrospective show of Ken Lum, one of Canada’s most well-known modernconceptual artists is on view through Sept. 25, 2011 at Vancouver Art Gallery.750 Hornby. Call (604) 662-4719 or www.vanartgallery.bc.ca.

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Performing Arts

  • Seattle jazz vocalist Primo Kim holds down a weekly gig at El Gaucho in Bellevue.Catch him there every Sunday and Monday at 6 p.m. Located 555 – 110th Ave.NE. Call (425) 455-2734.
  • Jazz group, the Killerbees co-led by Bob Antolin plays weekly on Thursdays atWaid’s Hatian Cuisine at 1212 E. Jefferson.
  • Jazz bassist Steve Kim is part of a weekly jam with the trio, Mock, Kim & Willis atMIX every Tuesday at 8 p.m. 6006 – 12th Ave. S. Call (206) 767-0280.

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Film/Media

  • South Korean Director Kim Jee-woon (“A Tale of Two Sisters”) presents “I SawThe Devil”, starring Choi Min-sik (“Oldboy”) and Lee Byung-hyun in a relentlessrevenge thriller. Through April 7 at the Varsity.
  • “The Desert of Forbidden Art” is a documentary film that shows how aRussian man rescued thousands of works of art and created a museum inUzbekistan. Screens Thursday, April 7 at 7 p.m. Seattle Asian Art Museum. See www.seattleartmuseum.org.
  • If you missed the Seattle run of the documentary film “Bhutto” recentlyat the Varsity, you have one more chance. It screens as part of Frye ArtMuseum’s “Community Cinema Seattle” series for free on Sat., April 9 at 2 p.m.in the museum auditorium. A mesmerizing look at one of South Asia’s fewfemale rulers whose reign was cut short by assassination and political intrigue.Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Ave. on First Hill. Call (206) 622-9250 or go towww.fryemuseum.org.
  • Opening soon is “The Last Godfather”, a comedy by Hyung-rae Shim (“DragonWars”). It stars the South Korean director as a mafioso’s (portrayed by HarveyKeitel) mentally challenged son being trained to be his father’s successor.Screens at Regal Cinemas Meridian 16 in Seattle, Cinemark’s Century FederalWay in Federal Way and AMC Loews at Alderwood Mall Stadium 16 inLynnwood. Visit www.lastgodfather.com.
  • “ZeroBridge” is the debut feature of Tariq Tapa, a US born filmmaker of Kashmiri/Jewish American descent. The film tells the story of a Kashmiri teenagepickpocket who longs to re-unite with his adoptive mother in Delhi only to find hislife complicated when he falls for a woman whose passport he has stolen. April22 – 28 at NW Film Forum.
  • New York artist turned film director Julian Schnabel’s newest film entitled “Miral”looks at the origins of the Israeli-Palestine conflict. Stars Indian actress FreidaPinto (“Slimdog Millionaire”) in the lead. Coming to Seattle shortly.
  • “Made in India” is a new documentary film produced and directed by RebeccaHaimowitz and Vaishali Sinha that explores the topic of reproductive “outsourcing”. Tolearn more about the film, go to www.madeinindiamovie.com.
  • Director Cary Joji Fukunaga (“Sin Nombre”) switches gears and geographymoving from the tropical heat of the Americas to the dark, brooding moorswith his adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s classic, “Jane Eyre”. Opening soon atvarious Seattle theatres.

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Art News/Opportunities

  • Noted local architect George Suyama has a new book about his workentitled “Suyama: A Complex Serenity” (UW Press) by Grant Hildebrand.
  • Local composer and performance artist Byron Au Yong was one of 31 artistsinvited to a residency at Sundance Institute’s Theatre Program at BANFF ArtsCenter. He will work on the theatre piece, “Stuck Elevator”, based on a true storyof a Chinese takeout deliveryman trapped in a Bronx elevator for over 81 hours.For details, email [email protected]
  • Seattle-raised singer/songwriter and International Examiner contributing writer,Emi Meyer will have a new album out entitled “ Suitcase of Stones”. It comes outMarch 9 in Japan and May 9 in the United States.
  • Seattle-raised poet/writer/professor Paisley Rekdal received the Amy LowellPoetry Traveling Scholarship and was awarded a paid year of travel and studyabroad. Both Paisley and her mother, Cynthia have been contributing writers tothe International Examiner.
  • Local photographer Barry Wong (formerly with the Seattle Times) has photocards of some of his food/produce still-lifes available for purchase. For details, goto www.barrywongphoto.com.
  • Seattle artist Diem Chau has had her work published in two recent books. “JuxtapozHandmade” and “Indiecraft” by Jo Waterhouse.
  • Zoe Donnell, curatorial coordinator at Tacoma Art Museum has been selectedto take part in a curator exchange program sponsored by the Japan Foundation.Young American curators will tour Japan, visit museums/curator counterpartsand will participate in conversations. Donnell curated “Edo to Tacoma: JapaneseWoodblock Prints from the Collection at Tacoma Art Museum” which recentlyclosed.
  • Deanna Fei’s debut novel entitled “A Thread of Sky” tells the story ofgenerations of women in a Chinese American family. It was a New York Timeseditor’s choice. It is now published in a new paperback edition. Go towww.deannafei.com for details.
  • The Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Award for smaller museums, libraries, collections and exhibitions in book design went to Yasufumi Nakamori for “Katsura: PicturingModernism in Japanese Architecture: Photographs by Ishimoto Yasuhiro” whichaccompanied an exhibition at the Houston MFA and was last shown at thePortland Japanese Garden.
  • Yoko Ono has been selected to receive the Hiroshima Art Prize, given everythree years to artists who promote peace through their work. One will receive agrant and an exhibition at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art thissummer.
  • Congratualtions to Kaili Chun, Chitra Ganesh and Lynne Yamamoto who allreceived artists grants from the Joan Mitchell Foundation’s Painters & SculptorsGrant Program.
  • American video artist/photographer Laurel Nakadate is the cover story for theMarch 2011 issue of ModernPainters in a story entitled “365 Days: A Catalogueof Tears”. Go to [email protected]
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