1. Highlights
  2. Visual Arts
  3. Performing Arts
  4. Film/Media
  5. Written Arts
  6. Art News/ Opportunites

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Highlights

  • The Morning Star Korean Cultural Center  (see related article this issue) perform “Narae”. A performance of Korean music and dance, both traditional and modern at The Edmonds Center for The Northwest on Nov. 13 at 7 p.m. Call (206) 251-5659.
  • As we move into winter do you find yourself craving more light? Then why not check out a group show entitled “Light” with lighted sculpture featuring Elaine Hanowell, HiiH Lights of Portland (courtesy of KOBO), June Sekiguchi and Kenzan Tsutakawa-Chinn. At Artxchange Gallery. Through Dec. 31 with many activities and workshops planned.  Located at 512 First Ave. S. Call (206) 839-0377 or visit www.artxchange.org.
  • The Intiman Theatre presents a new adaptation of “The Scarlet Letter” written by Naomi Iizuka and directed by Lear deBessonet. Through Dec. 5. Located at 201 Mercer at Seattle Center. Call (206) 269-1900 or e-mail [email protected]
  • If you have visited Wing Luke Museum of the Asia Pacific American Experience to see the exhibits only, you’re only getting part of the picture. November 4 is the Museum’s First Thursday from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Get free gallery admission as well as the historic hotel tour at a discount (free for members). Also opening that night is “Born Into Identity: The Asian Pacific American Adoptee Experience from 4 – 6 p.m.  Through artwork by APA Adoptee artists and oral histories, you can explore the complexities of being an APA Adoptee. Located at 719 South King St. Call (206) 623-5124 or visit: www.wingluke.org.
  • The Woodside/Braseth Gallery presents a series of shows honoring the Tsutakawa family’s artistic legacy. A career retrospective of sorts entitled  “George Tsutakawa Centennial” is on view as well as new work by sculptor son, Gerard Tsutakawa. Finally, a group show entitled “George Tsutakawa & Friends” showcases the work of the artist’s many associates and friends. On view through November. Opening reception on Nov.  11. Located at 2101 9th Ave.  Call (206) 622-7243 for details.
  • Interested in seeing new plays by Asian American playwrights? Check out “Insatiable!”, a festival of new play readings by local playwrights Kathy Hsieh, Maggie Lee, May Nguyen and Roger Tang Nov. 4 – 8. Presented by The SIS Writers Group. Prima Vera Arts Center at 112 5th Ave. N. on the 2nd floor. Call (206) 323-9443 or e-mail [email protected].
  • Want to get out of Seattle and check out another arts scene? Try the Tacoma/Olympia area. Tacoma sponsors their Annual Open Studio Exhibit November 6 & 7 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. all around the city. At the Merlino Art Center you can see demonstrations and hands-on painting by Fumiko Kimura in Loft #8 (sumi-e, calligraphy and collages), George Takahasi in Loft #8 (sumi-e) and Lois Yoshida in Loft #1 (sumi-e & calligraphy). Located at 508 6th Ave. (3rd floor) in Tacoma. MalPina Chan contributes her kiln-formed glass and monoprints to a multimedia group show at Childhood’s End Gallery at 222 Fourth Ave. Shows until November 19. Call (360) 943-3724.

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Visual Arts

  • Historical photos of the famous Katsura Detached Palace in Japan in 1953 by Ishimoto Yasuhiro are on view at Seattle Japanese Garden through Nov. 14. Located at 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E.
  • Seattle artist Diem Chau has work in a group show entitled “Media Mix” Nov. 1 – Dec. 2 at Eavelt Gallery at Columbia Basin College at 2000 N. 20th Ave. in Pasco, Wash. Chau is also written up in the Fall 2010 issue of Hyphen Magazine.
  • The work of Carina del Rosario and Christine Tran and many others is included in a group show entitled “Picture Us Center of Attention – Photo Center NW Faculty Exhibition.” On view through November 24.  Faculty talks are set for November 19 at 7 p.m.  Located at 900 12th Avenue. Call (206) 720-7222 x11.
  • Against the backdrop of the Great Depression, the U.S. government created the Public Works of Art Program – the first federal government program to support the arts nationally. From the Smithsonian American Art Museum comes a selection of the paintings made with the support from this program. “1934: A New Deal For Artists” is on view from through January 9, 2011. Whatcom Museum at the Lightcatcher. Located at 121 Prospect Street in Bellingham. Cal (360) 778-8930 or visit www.whatcommuseum.org.
  • “Waste Not” is a monumental installation that is a collaboration between the contemporary artist Song Dong and his mother. All of the everyday objects collected during her entire life are piled up within the frame of her house. In an interview with the artist by Sus Van Elzen (from “Dragon & Rose Garden – Art And Power in China) the artist goes on to say, “However it is also a very personal history that revolves around my mother, because four years ago her husband, my father, suddenly died of a heart attack. My mother then went a little mad. She no longer wanted to leave it and only talked about her things, she lived in the middle of them, watched TV and refused to talk to anyone. Because I am an artist I had the idea of making this exhibition, also to help my mother deal with her ties to the past.” He goes on to say that the process of putting together the installation drew her mother out of isolation and regained her interest in the world. October 2 – January 16, 2011.  Vancouver Art Gallery. Located at 750 Hornby Street in Vancouver, B.C. Call (604) 662-4719.
  • The work of Saya Moriyasu, Yuki Nakamura, Arun Sharma, Brendan Tang, Patti Warashina and others is included in “BAM Biennial 2010: Clay Throwdown”. This is Bellevue Arts Museum’s new juried exhibition competition where artists are asked to make work expressly for the show. Continues on view through January 16. Noted ceramic artist and UW Art Professor Akio Takamori was one of the judges. Located at 510 Bellevue Way N.E. Cal (425) 519-0770.
  • Ordinary Household Gods” is a mixed media show by Tommer Peterson on view through November 6. Metalsmith artists Micki Lippe, Iris Guy and Jennifer Bennett showcase their jewelry. On view till Nov. 28. Hiih Lighting from Portland show their distinctive sculptural lighting from Nov. 6 through Dec. Opening reception for the above two shows is Nov. 6 from 6 – 8 p.m. The 5th Annual  “KOBO Simple Cup Show” opens November 13 from 6 – 8 p.m. and stays on view till December 5.  Located at KOBO Gallery at HIGO, 604 South Jackson Street. Call (206) 381-3000 or visit www.koboseattle.com.
  • “Trace Series” is a solo show of new work by Etsuko Ichikawa who uses the fire and smoke of molten glass as a paint brush. On view until the end of this year. At Tramel-Gagne in the Design Center located at 5701 6th Avenue S. #105. Call (206) 762-1511 or visit www.tgshowroom.com. Or call ArtXchange at (206) 838-0377 or visit www.artxchange.org.
  • “We Are Pilgrims: A suite of Woodblock prints by Annie Bissett” is the latest show at Cullom Gallery.  This series of hand-printed Japanese woodblock prints is an exploration of the artist’s own heritage as a Mayflower descendent and a critique of the immediate and far-reaching impact of the lives of the earliest settlers. Through November 27. Located at 603 S. Main St. Call (206) 919-8278 or visit www.cullomgallery.com.
  • The current trend towards abstraction is shown in contrast to the use of the figure in a group show of photography entitled “Contemporary Works from the Monsen Collection” on view through Nov. 28 in the North Galleries of the Henry Art Gallery. The work of Weng Fen is featured. Also in the works is an exhibition of photography by the Seattle Camera Club, a turn-of-the-century photographers group started by Dr. Kyo Koike and other Japanese Americans. 15th Ave. NE & NE 41st St. Call (206) 543-2280 or visit www.henryart.org.
  • “Paradoxes of Living on Holy Land” is a show that features photographs from Jerusalem and the West Bank by Rajiv Kapoor in Seattle University’s Vachon & Kinsey Galleries. On view through December 3. Call (206) 296-5360.
  • “From Edo To Tacoma – Three Eras of Japanese Woodblock Prints: Edo, Meiji, and 20th Century Works” remains on view through February 13, 2011. Tacoma Art Museum is at 1701 Pacific Avenue in Tacoma. Call (253) 272-4258 or visit www.tacomaartmuseum.org.
  • The Burke Museum mounts their first major exhibition of their international textile collection showing work from the peoples of the Americas, Asia and the Pacific Islands in “Weaving Heritage: Textile Masterpieces From the Burke Collection”. Through February 27, 2012. Call (206) 543-5590 or go to www.washington.edu/burkemuseum.
  • Paul Komada has a show of paintings and fiber art at Gallery4Culture. November 5 – 24. Call (206) 296-8674 or go to www.4culture.org.
  • Work by Paul Horiuchi is included in a group show of paintings by Northwest masters. Through November 5. Woodside/Braseth Gallery at 2101 Ninth Ave. Call (206) 622-7243 or go to www.woodsidebrasethgallery.com.
  • The work of Frank Kunishige is included in the current exhibit entitled “The Arts and Crafts Movement in the Pacific Northwest” on view now through November 28. “With Our Hands – Folk Art Treasures”. Vietnamese paper folding is just one of the many folk arts gathered from across the state for this exhibit that attempts to answer the question, “What is folk art?”.  On view through December with various folk art demonstrations and activities planned. Washington State History Museum, 1911 Pacific Avenue in Tacoma.
  • “Wang Huaiqing: A Painter’s Painter in Contemporary China” traces the artist’s development through 23 innovative works. Recognized as one of China’s leading contemporary artists for his ability to blur the line between abstract and naturalistic art. Nov. 18 – July 17. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 Prospect in Volunteer Park. Call (206) 654-3100 or visit www.seattleartmuseum.org.
  • “Order and Border” is an on-going exhibit on the third floor World Textiles Gallery at Seattle Art Museum downtown. The selection from SAM’s permanent collection puts stripes in the spotlight with Japanese bedcovers and undergarments, a meditation cloth from Laos, an African teacher’s disguise and items from many other global cultures. Call (206) 654-3121 or visit seattleartmuseum.org.
  • “A Refugee’s Journey of Survival And Hope” is the latest show to open at the “Wing”. See life through the eyes of a refugee through personal stories, photographs and multimedia. Show continues on view till Dec. 12, 2010. “Sacred Seattle” is a new exhibit opening September 16 from 6 – 8 p.m. It traces spaces, places and paths where Asian Pacific Americans both belong to and long for the sacred.   ”Home Revealed: Artists of the Chinatown-International District” remains on view till April 17, 2011. “APIA Adoptees” is a new exhibition opening on November 4 from 6 – 8 p.m. Calligraphy artist Chiyo Sanada shows you how to create sumi gift bags on November 20 at 1 p.m. “Local Refugee Organizations Speak” is a forum set for November 20 at 4:30 p.m. about working with local refugees and how you can get involved. For details on all of the above, go to www.wingluke.org or call (206) 623-5124.
  • Local artist MalPina Chan curates a show on book art entitled “The Art of the Book: Hand to Hand”. Nov. 17 – Jan. 9. Columbia City Gallery at 4864 Rainier Ave. S. Call (206) 760-9843 or go to www.columbiacitygallery.com.
  • Studio photography and black and white photos by David Narazaki are featured through Nov. at SRG Gallery at 110 Union, #300. Call (206) 973-1700 or go to  www.srgpartnership.com.
  • The work of Paul Horiuchi and George Tsutakawa is included in a group show entitled “Guy Anderson and other Friends – the Paul I. Gingrich, Jr. Collection” on view through Jan. 2 at Museum of Northwest War at 121 South First St. La Connor, Wash. Call (360) 466-4446 or go to www.museumofnwart.org.
  • Seattle-raised artist Roger Shimomura keeps busy with four one-man shows around the country. His latest entitled “An American Knockoff” is at the Flomenhaft Gallery in New York City through December. Go to www.rshim.com for more information.
  • Fans of Japanese Pop culture, anime, and manga won’t want to miss “Aki Con 2010”. This festival includes 24-hour anime viewing, panels, workshops and more. Coming November 5 – 7 at the Bellevue Hilton Hotel. For details, go to www.akicon.org.

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Performing Arts

  • Adam Rapp’s new drama about intimacy and friends entitled “Red Light Winter” marks the debut of new theatre company, Azotheatre. Richard Nguyen Sloniker of “SIS” fame stars with Tim Gouran and Mariel Leto. Directed by Desdemona Chiang who also worked in theatre productions at UW while a student. At Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S. in Seattle. Through Nov. 13. Call (800) 838-3006 or go to www.axotheatre.org.
  • Tlingit/Filipino storyteller/singer/musician Gene Tagaban performs Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. at Stonington Gallery. $5 admission. Located at 119 S. Jackson St. in Seattle. Call (206) 405-4040. Visit www.stoningtongallery.com.
  • “The Wing” helps sponsor a “Chinatown/ID & Little Saigon Shop-O-Rama”. Shop, eat and get festive with neighborhood shops with artist workshops and a treasure hunt. Nov. 4 – Dec. 22 (every Th. & Sat.). Call (206) 623-5124 x203 or go to www.wingluke.org/marketplace.
  • Celebrate Hmong New Year at Seattle Center’s Center house on Nov. 6 all day long. With demonstrations, performances, food and children’s activities. Located at 305 Harrison St. Visit www.seattlecenter.com/events.
  • Come to the Filipino Community Center and help celebrate the 75th Anniversary Celebration of the Filipino Community of Seattle. Located at 5740 ML King Jr. Way S. in Seattle. Nov. 6. Starts at 10 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Call (206) 722-9372.
  • “Bunka No Hi – Japanese Culture Day” happens from 1 – 5 p.m. on Nov. 7 at the Japanese Cultural & Community Center at 1414 S. Weller St. in Seattle.   Expect traditional Japanese music, tea ceremony, martial arts demonstrations and many other activities. Call (206) 568-7114 or e-mail [email protected].
  • To mark the conclusion of a week-long residency at Cornish College of the Arts by French-Vietnamese jazz guitarist Nguyen Le and his Saiyuki Trio with Mieko Miyazaki on koto/shamisen and Prabhu Edouard on tabla present a special concert with guest artist, Rudresh Mahanthappa on alto saxophone.  Nov. 20 at 8 p.m. Co-sponsored with Earshot Jazz. At PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 East Roy Street on N. in Seattle. Visit www.earshot.org or call (206) 547-6763.

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Film/Media

  • See new films on your neighbor’s couch. “Couch Fest Films” is a festival of new short films by Seattle filmmakers set to screen in homes around the city.  Free. Noon – 5 p.m. Check www.couchfestfilms.com for locations.
  • A documentary film entitled “442 – Live With Honor, Die With Dignity” as directed by Juichi Suzuki will be screened on Nov. 13 at 2 p.m. NVC Memorial Hall at 1212 S. King St. in Seattle. Free. Call (206) 322-1122 or e-mail [email protected].

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Written Arts

  • Poet Don Mee Choi reads with others at Pilot Books on Nov. 18. Located at 219 Broadway E (upstairs). Go to www.pilotbooksseattle.com for details.
  • The Elliott Bay Book Company now situated in their cozy new digs on Capitol Hill hits the group running this fall with readings on almost every day of the week. Some highlights – Poet, playwright, theatre artist & activist Shailja Patel reads from her new book of poetry entitled “Migritude” (Kaya) on Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. Andrew Lam, Bay Area news journalist Andrew Lam reads from his new book of essays entitled “East Eats West: Writing in Two Hemispheres (Heyday), a collection that looks at how the Vietnamese diaspora has changed both the U.S. & Vietnam. Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. Seattle Public Central Library Microsoft Auditorium at 1000 Fourth downtown. Visit www.spl.org or call (206) 386-4536. All readings at Elliott Bay unless otherwise noted. Please see www.elliottbaybook.com for more details.
  • The Gardner Center for Asian Art & Ideas present “Saturday University-Sacred Sites of Asia”, a series of talks set for Saturdays through November 15 and January 15 – 22. 9:30 – 11 a.m. at the Seattle Asian Art Museum in Volunteer Park. Professor Boreth Ly talks about “Lives of Angkor Wat” on November 6 and Pam McClusky, Curator of Art of Adfrica and Oceania at SAM talks about “Australian Aboriginal Art as a Guide to Sacred Places”. Barbara Pollack talks about her book, “The Wild, Wild East: An American Art Critic’s Adventures in China” on Nov. 21 at 3 p.m. Call (206) 442-8480 or visit seattleartmuseum.org/gardnercenter for more details.
  • Kazim Ali reads from a new book of poems entitled “The Far Mosque”  on Nov. 18 at Open Books. Located at 2144 N. 45th in Seattle. Call (206) 633-0811.
  • Archipelago Books presents Buddhadeva Bose’s “My Kind of Girl” as translated from the Bengali by Arunava Sinha. Set for October release. The book tells the story of four strangers stuck on a December night at a railway station and how the sight of a young loving couple prompts them all to share stories of love and loss and the vagaries of the human heart. Go to www.archipelagobooks.org for details.
  • Samrat Upadhyay’s “Buddha’s Orphans” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) tells a story that covers over a half century of political and social upheaval in contemporary Nepal. Just released.
  • Monique Truong follows her debut novel, “The Book of Salt” with something a little more autobiographical with “Bitter in the Mouth” (Random House), the story of a young woman’s experience growing up looking “Asian” in the rural South. Just released.
  • Ron Chew and Ken Mochizuki have co-authored a new book entitled “Years of Caring, The Story of Nikkei Concerns”. For information, go to www.nikkeiconcerns.org.

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Art News/ Opportunites

  • The Ethnic Art Gallery was established by a coalition of City of Seattle employees to showcase emerging and established artists of color. For questions, go to [email protected] Asian & Pacific Islander artists can call (206) 386-0043 or e-mail [email protected]
  • Poets and Writers offer matching grants up to $300 to pay writers who are speaking as part of literary programming. To download details, go to www.pw.org/funding.
  • The idea for a collective art gallery in Seattle’s Chinatown/International District neighborhood is in the planning stages. Plans call for a gallery space that will showcase visual art by new & emerging artists of color. If you want more information or want to attend a meeting, e-mail Carina at [email protected] or log on to www.flickr.com/photos/cadelrosario.
  • Artist Trust is accepting nominations for the Irving and Yvonne Twining Humber Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement to a Washington state female artist, age 60 or over. Deadline is December 15, 2010. Go to www.artisttrust.org for details.
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